Do It The Hard Way
 
Do It The Hard Way

It's not real quick and it's not real easy, but it is REAL...

And it Really Works!

 

 

 
 Calorie Needs
The number of calories the body needs each day is different for every person. Use our simple calculator to see what you need.
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Fitness Tests

Everyone likes to know that what they are doing is working. So let's learn how to track our progress in a healthy way.

Just watching a number on a scale is not productive. First of all muscle weighs more than fat, so if you are exercising and gaining muscle, the number on the scale can go up instead of down. The goal of "Do It The Hard Way" is overall health and fitness, not just "losing weight".

I know it would be a waste of time to tell you that you shouldn't weight yourself, but it's not the most accurate way to monitor progress.

I recommend that you use a tape measure and take your measurements once a month.

Another way we are going to monitor progress is with a series of simple fitness tests that you can do by yourself at home.

You don't need any special equipment. Everything is explained in each step.

Once you complete each test you should record your score and keep it with your body measurements.

Step Test

Using a 12 inch high bench (or a similar sized stair in your house), step on and off for 3 minutes. Step up with one foot and then the other. Step down with one foot followed by the other foot. Try to maintain a steady four beat cycle. It's easy to maintain if you say "up, up, down, down". Go at a steady and consistent pace. At the end of 3 minutes, remain standing while you immediately check your heart rate by taking your pulse for one minute. Record that heart rate reading on your progress chart under "Step Test".

Click here to see a chart where you can compare your results.

Push Ups

Men should use the standard "military style" pushup position with only the hands and the toes touching the floor. Women have the additional option of using the "bent knee" position. To do this, kneel on the floor, hands on either side of the chest and keep your back straight. Do as many push ups as possible until exhaustion. Count the total number of pushups performed and record that number on your progress chart under "Push Ups".

Click here to see a chart where you can compare your results.

Sit Ups

Count how many you can do in one minute and record that number on your progress chart under "Sit Ups". Starting Position: Lie on the floor with your knees bent, feet flat. Your hands should rest on your thighs. Technique: Squeeze your stomach, push your back flat and raise high enough for your hands to touch the tops of your knees. Don't pull with you neck or head and keep your lower back on the floor.

Click here to see a chart where you can compare your results.

Squats

Stand in front of a chair or bench with your feet a shoulders width apart, facing away from it. Squat down and lightly touch the chair before standing back up. A good sized chair is one that makes your knees at right angles when you are sitting. Keep doing this until you're fatigued.

Record the number of squats you can do your progress chart under "Squats".

Click here to see a chart where you can compare your results.

Sit & Reach

This test involves sitting on the floor with legs out straight ahead. Place a ruler on the floor with the "0" edge against your heels (shoes off). Both knees are to be kept flat against the floor. Lean forward slowly as far as possible and holds the greatest stretch for two seconds. Make sure there are no jerky movements, and that the fingertips remain level and the legs flat. The score is recorded as the distance before (negative) or beyond (positive) the toes. Repeat twice and record the best score on your progress chart under "Sit & Reach".

Click here to see a chart where you can compare your results.

Copyright © 2010 Do It The Hard Way All rights reserved.

Do It The Hard Way is intended for informational and educational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for advice and guidance from any health care professional. Always seek the advice of your doctor or qualified health care provider prior to starting any new diet or exercise program and with any questions you may have regarding any medical conditions. The creators and participants of this site disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided here.