Portion Sizes
See a visual reference for some common portion sizes.
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1  Sugar
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One sweet secret..
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1  Potatoes
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The power of the potato
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1  Whole Grains
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Make sure you get the "whole" grain
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1  Dairy Equivalents
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What counts as "1 Cup" in the milk group?
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1  Protein
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A few words about protein.
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1  Oils
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Oils - the good, the bad, and the ugly.
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My Alternative To The Food Pyramid

So...what is healthy eating?
This is a basic guide for everyday eating.

(The amounts given are based on 2,000 calories per day)

Fruits & Vegetables:

  • 2 cups of fruit
    • Stay away from fruit juice - it's really only SUGAR water
  • 2 1/2 cups of vegetables
    • Include ALL types of vegetables (yes, even potatoes)
    • dark green, orange, legumes, starchy vegetables, ALL of them!

Whole Grains:

  • 6 ounces (see more equivalents here)
    • 1 ounce equivalents:
      • 1 slice of bread
      • 1 cup ready-to-eat cereal
      • 1/2 cup cooked rice, pasta, or cooked cereal
  • Make sure all grains are WHOLE grains
  • Look for the words "100% whole wheat" on the label
  • Don't be fooled by the color or simply the word "Wheat" or "Multi-Grain"
  • Better yet - read the ingredients!! If you see the words "enriched", "unbleached" or "bleached" - put it back.

Dairy: (Milk, Yogurt, Cheese)

  • 3 cups - see some what is 1 cup of dairy
  • ALWAYS choose fat-free or low fat dairy products

Meats & Beans:

  • 5 to 6 ounces (see some portions sizes)
  • Meat and poultry should be lean or low-fat. Watch for claims of simply "low-fat" or "lower-fat". Don't be fooled by any claims on the front of a package - turn it over and READ the nutritional info. Look for very low saturated fat and very little sodium. Fresh meat of any kind should contain very little sodium unless it has been added.
  • Fish, nuts and seeds contain healthy oils, so choose these foods frequently.

Fats & Oils:

  • Limit your fat intake to about 30 percent of total calories.

  • You should consume no more than 2 - 3 grams of Trans Fat per day. Be very careful when reading labels about trans at. Beginning in January 2006 the FDA required all food manufacturers to list Trans Fat on the label. But, there's a catch - - watch for the portion size. The FDA rule is that if each PORTION contains .5 grams or less of Trans Fat, it can be labeled "NO TRANS FAT" or "FAT FREE". For instance, if you buy a package of cookies labeled "FAT FREE" and the serving size is 3 cookies and those 3 cookies contain .5 grams of trans fat AND you eat 6 cookies - you will be consuming 1 gram of Trans Fat! The best way to be sure there is NO Trans Fat is to read the ingredients - if you see the words hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated - you can be pretty sure there is at least some Trans Fat.

  • Each gram of fat contains 9 calories, meaning that if you consume 2,000 calories per day your total fat grams should be around 67 (2000 * 30 % / 9 = 66.666)

  • Focus on Mono-unsaturated fats like olive oil and canola oil, and Omega-3 & 6 fatty acids

  • Try to balance your intake of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. Do that by eating things like tuna/salmon/trout or Omega-3 oils like flax seed.

Eat These

Don't Eat These

  • Unsaturated fat

  • Polyunsaturated fat

  • Mono-unsaturated fat

  • Omega-3 & Omega-6 fatty acids

  • Saturated fat

  • Trans fat

  • Partially hydrogenated fat


 
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